Charlie Hebdo: Liberty should –again- lead the people ‎

“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to death your right to say it.”

This quote, usually attributed to Voltaire, doesn’t seem to make sense to many people who ‎still question the freedom of expression and ask for ‘laws’ to ‘regulate’ it, or simply put, for ‎mechanisms to reverse and ambush one of the most celebrated values in the civilized ‎world and a basic human right.‎
To reduce the Charlie Hebdo tragedy into a religious ideology or a political message is to miss ‎the bigger picture: the cultural context. It is the cultural context that I will intend to address in ‎this message.

And because my interest is mainly cultural, my conclusion is that you can never ‎explain freedom of expression to people who have never fully experienced it; people whose ‎minds are trapped in the straightjackets of state-sponsored media and the self-‎administered taboos of religion and sex. ‎
Most of the Arabs that I know condemn the attack on Charlie Hebdo, but attach a disclaimer ‎to this condemnation, undermining it in many cases: We condemn terrorism but…‎

When examined through a European moral lens, this is unacceptable because condemning ‎terrorism should come with no ‘but’s attached. Seen through an Arab cultural lens, things ‎would look quite different, as scores of innocent Arabs are killed every day in Palestine, Iraq, ‎Syria and elsewhere without anyone lifting a finger or doing as much as showing sympathy. ‎This is why many Arabs would tell you I am not Charlie; I am Ahmed, I am Gaza, to the end of ‎the list, and they definitely have a point.‎

Again, and because this is not about politics, the West (consciously or unconsciously) falls into ‎the enormous mistake of referring to the assassins as Islamists and/or Jihadists, while the ‎only term that should be used to describe them is one that we all know all too well: ‎terrorists! Islamists are not equivalent neither to Muslims nor to terrorists, and the term ‎Jihad should never be used lightly by those who do not understand it, because likewise, you ‎can never explain Jihad to a secular mind.‎

This is not about a clash of civilizations, but rather about cultural relativism as a friend ‎referred to it…it is about a cultural ‘divide’. Caricature is a very fine art and a powerful tool for social and cultural change, ‎and by nature it mocks and reveals things that many people do not want to see or accept. ‎Not so to those accustomed to censorship as the easiest ‘and cheapest’ way to fix things. The ‎worst is yet to come, as the attacks give a new impetus to the European far right and the ‎ultras, and as a new wave of Islamophobia looms in the horizon, only to add insult to ‎injury…that is, of course, if you still look at the ‘region’ rather than ‘your corner of the world’. ‎

PS. This article represents my personal opinion as an Arab living in Europe.

Eugène Delacroix_-_La_liberté_guidant_le_peuple

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